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7 Simple and Easy Ways to Show Employees You Value Their Work

By Barbara Beauregard   |    November 11, 2019   |    6:23 PM

How to Thank Your Employees (Without Spending Money)

It’s the season for giving thanks, both personally and professionally.

On the professional side, you likely have many people to thank for your company’s success, including clients, vendors, mentors and (perhaps most importantly) employees.

When you give thanks to your team and show employees that their work is valued, the benefits are clear. When people feel valued, they:

  • Are more likely to feel invested in their work and how it impacts the business, which leads to higher quality work and higher employee engagement.
  • Are generally happier and more satisfied with their workplace. 
  • Tend to be happier and more engaged, which means turnover is also reduced.

Thanking your team and showing them how much you appreciate their contributions doesn’t have to be expensive or time consuming, either. With these 7 easy ways to give thanks to employees, showing appreciation couldn’t be easier.

1. Don’t forget the little things

A handwritten note of recognition or a quick email to say you’ve noticed someone’s efforts can go a long way.

2. When thanking someone, be specific

Your small gestures of appreciation should go beyond, “Good job!” Get specific and share some details.

For example, you might say, “Thanks for taking the new intern under your wing. I’m impressed by your initiative, and you’ll be crucial to this new person’s success.”

3. Make time for your team

It’s common for employees to feel disconnected from leadership. This isn’t surprising, especially since leaders are busy and often on-the-go, which makes it hard to find time to check-in with everyone.

Even if you’re busy, you need to make time for your team. One great way to make time and show your appreciation is to schedule monthly lunches. You can absolutely talk about business, but don’t forget to learn more about the employee’s personal life, too. 

4. Provide opportunities to learn and grow

Talented employees don’t want to coast by with nothing to do. They want new challenges and opportunities to expand their skills. Show that you value their expertise with increased responsibility, exciting projects, industry conferences and continuing education. 

But, don’t expect them to tackle these challenges during their free time — that’s a surefire way to make people think you don’t value them. Instead, make sure employees have enough time to learn during work hours. 

5. Give employees the right tools for the job

Too many employees are trying to do their work using subpar tools. For starters, make sure your team has laptops that aren’t sluggish. 

From there, you can make even more improvements. Ergonomic workstations (or an allowance for employees who work remotely) are always appreciated. Dual monitors, wireless keyboards and mice, laptop stands and other relevant technology can also help your team do better work more comfortably. 

6. Be honest with your team

Honestly is one of those things that can be easier said than done, especially when the company is faced with difficulties.

Always err on the side of honesty, though — it shows employees that you care enough to share the good and the bad.

7. Ask for feedback (and listen)

Show employees that you respect them by asking for feedback on things that can be changed for the better… and then listen to their suggestions.

The listening part is critical. If you fail to address legitimate employee concerns, your team won’t feel valued or appreciated.